DANIEL B. WEBER

University of Oklahoma

Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms

Phone: 405-325-1932

E-Mail: dweber@ou.edu

http://www.caps.ou.edu/~dweber

 

Education

 

            Ph.D. in Meteorology, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, August

1997.

 

                        Dissertation:  An investigation of the diurnal variability of the Central

                                              Colorado downslope windstorm.

 

                        M.S. in Meteorology, Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, 1987.

 

                        Thesis:  A study of the jet stream cirrus clouds.

 

                        B.S. in Meteorology, Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, 1984.

                        B.S. in Geology, Department of Geology, University of Utah, 1983.

 

 

Professional Experience

 

2001-Present   Senior Research Scientist

                        Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS), University of Oklahoma,

Norman, Oklahoma.

 

ARPS Model Development, real time forecast and verification group leader.  Responsible for the improvement of the ARPS including physics component development, optimization, parallel code optimization (MPI) in addition to testing and verifying the ARPS on a daily long-term basis.   Current research interests include investigating the behavior and periodicity of moist deep convection using a high-resolution numerical model, microphysics, soil model development, and nested grid techniques.  Project manager for a web based environmental workbench development project in cooperation with NCSA.

 

 

1997-2001      Research Scientist

                        Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS), University of Oklahoma,

Norman, Oklahoma.

 

Project manager and Research Scientist involved in several CAPS projects including aircraft turbulence, microphysics and soil model research.  In addition, I have extensive experience in ARPS model testing, validation, and enhancement of the ARPS model dynamics, and radiation code.  Optimized ARPS for use on a single processor on vector and scalar platforms and developed a massively parallel nested grid algorithm.  Current research interests include investigating near surface vortices associated with strong mountain wave flow, the periodicity of moist deep convection using a high-resolution numerical model and microphysics and soil model development.

 

 

1991-1997      Graduate Assistant

                        School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma.

 

As part of my doctoral research, I built a three-dimensional numerical model for simulating the affects of the diurnal cycle on the mountain wave and downslope windstorm environments.  The numerical model is compressible, conserves total energy and utilizes a computationally efficient generalized coordinate transformation.  The model has been successfully ported to a commodity based PC clusters running Linux, an IBM RS/6000 workstation, and Cray’s J90 and C90 supercomputers.  The           model is also capable of running on a group of workstations or on the massively parallel CRAY T3E supercomputer via standard message passing techniques.

 

 

1992-1996       ARPS Model Development Team

                        CAPS, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma.

                       

                        Designed, implemented, and tested a terrain pre-processing program for use with

                        the ARPS.  This objective analysis software package utilizes a multipass Barnes

                        method to prepare various types of terrain data (1 degree, 5 minute, and 30 second

                        resolutions).  Reviewed the current lateral and vertical normal velocity boundary

                        condition methods used in mesoscale models.  Implemented and tested the ARPS

                        radiation boundary conditions for the normal velocity components.  Coded and

                        tested the sub-grid scale closure scheme for the ARPS.

           

 

1989-1991       Meteorologist

                        Harding Lawson Associates, Oak Brook, IL.

 

                        Performed Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit analyses using

the USEPA recommended air  dispersion models for clients in the chemical, power

generation, and smelting and refining industries.  I became familiar with the

USEPA’s ISCST, ISCLT, and COMPLEX1 dispersion models and the suite of

                        models developed by the Ontario Ministry of Environment.  Managed

                        quality assurance programs which produced reliable data for use in plant-

                        wide emission reports.  Geological experience includes assisting a large soil

                        remediation project and was responsible for soil sampling, geologic

                        interpretation of sediments and on-site management of remediation activities. 

 

                                   

1987-1989       Environmental Analyst

                        Kennecott Copper Corporation, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

                        As an environmental analyst with one of the world’s largest copper

                        producers, I was responsible for a wide range of environmental issues. 

                        These included daily on-site inspections of the many smelter, refinery, and

                        concentrator emission sources.  As a meteorologist, I prepared daily

                        weather, precipitation, and dispersion forecasts tailored for plant

                        operations.  My primary responsibility was to carefully determine the

                        effects of poor dispersion conditions on copper production and propose a

                        crisis management plan to plant managers and operations personnel.  I

                        became experienced in the handling and disposal of hazardous wastes

                        including asbestos and spill management via on-site and formal classroom

                        instruction.  Developed a 3-dimensional regional air dispersion model which

                        incorporated forecast winds from the National Weather Service Nested Grid 

                        Model.

 

 

1986-1987       Meteorologist Intern

                        National Weather Service, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

                        Responsibilities as a meteorologist intern consisted of coding and

                        dissemination of surface and upper air operations.   Other duties included

                        providing forecasts for the general public and broadcasting forecast

                        products via the NOAA weather radio network.  My work also

                        encompassed the development of a regional scale forecast model with the

                        purpose of improving temperature, cloud, and precipitation forecasts for the

            mountainous areas of the Western United States. 

 

 

Teaching Experience

 

Fall 1993         Teaching Assistant, Atmospheric Thermodynamics

                        University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma.

           

                        Created and graded homework and exam questions for a junior level

                        thermodynamics course.  Presented occasional class lectures and exam review

                        sessions.

 

1991-1992       Teaching Assistant, Synoptic and Mesoscale Meteorology

                        University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma.

 

                        Teaching assistant for senior level synoptic meteorology course and mesoscale

                        dynamic course.  Duties included building and grading homework problems

                        and lab assignments and supervising review sessions.

 

Spring 1986     Teaching Assistant, Numerical Weather Prediction

                        University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

                        Teaching assistant for senior numerical weather prediction class.  Responsible

                        for grading homework problems and assisting students with computer assignments.

 

1984-1985       Teaching Assistant, Synoptic Meteorology

                        University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

                        Teaching assistant for senior level synoptic meteorology course.  Assisted

                        students with lab assignments and graded homework.

 

Proposals under Development or Consideration

 

          Co-PI, NCSA, MEAD Expedition, University of Illinois, October 2002 – September 2004.

 

PI, NSF, Initiation of moist deep convection, August 2003 – July 2006.

 

 

Funded Proposals

 

          Co-PI, Williams Corporation, University of Oklahoma, July 2001- September 2002.

 

Co-PI, NCSA, University of Illinois, January 2001- Present.

 

Co-PI, NCSA, University of Illinois, June - December 2000.

           

PI, Korean Meteorological Administration, June 2000 - May 2001.

 

Co-PI, Honeywell Corporation, August, 1998 - November 2000.

 

 

Consulting Projects

 

Co-PI, CB Research: Glidersonde and Dataplane Participation in the ARM Fall 2000 Water Vapor IOP.

 

Project Scientist, CB Research:  Meteorological consulting to American Airlines, March 2000-Febuary 2001.

 

 

Reviewed Publications

 

Weber, D.B., D.K. Lilly, and M. Xue, 2002: The effects of surface heat flux on the mountain wave environment.  In preparation for submittal to J. Atmos. Sci..

 

Weber, D.B., and F.W.Gallagher III, 2002: The use of a Remotely Piloted Vehicle to Observe Small Scale Spatial and Temporal Changes of Temperature and Relative Humidity in the Boundary Layer, submitted to J. Tech.

           

Brotzge, J.A., and D. Weber, 2002: Land-surface scheme validation using the Oklahoma Atmospheric Surface-layer Instrumentation system (OASIS) and Oklahoma Mesonet data: Preliminary results.  Meteor. Atmos. Phy., 80, 189-206.

 

Xue, M., K. K. Droegemeier, V. Wong, A. Shapiro, K. Brewster, F. Carr, D.

Weber, Y. Liu, and D.-H. Wang, 2001: The Advanced Regional Prediction System

(ARPS) - A multiscale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction

tool. Part II: Model physics and applications. Meteor. Atmos. Phys, 76, 143-165.

 

Doyle, J.D., D. R. Durran, B.A. Colle, C. Chen, M. Georgelin, V. Grubisic, W.R. Hsu, C.Y.

Huang, D. Landau, Y.L. Lin, G.S. Poulos, W.Y. Sun, D.B. Weber, M.G. Wurtele, and M.

Xue, 2000, 2000:  An intercomparison of model predicted wave breaking for the

11 January Boulder Windstorm.  Mon. Wea. Rev., Vol. 128, No. 3, 901-914.

 

            Durran, D.R., and D.B., Weber, 1988:  An investigation of the sharp poleward

            edge of cirrus clouds associated with midlatitude jet streams.  Mon. Wea. Rev.,

            Vol. 116, No. 3.

 

 

Conference Papers

 

Brotzge, J.A., and D. Weber, 2003: Using Observations to Develop, Initialize, and Validate Two Land-surface Schemes within ARPS.  xxth Conf., Long Beach, California, Amer. Meteor. Soc.

 

Xue, M., K. Brewster, D. Weber, K. W. Thomas, F. Kong, and E. Kemp, 2002: Real-time Storm-Scale Forecast Support for IHOP 2002 at CAPS. 15th Conf. Num. Wea. Pred./19th Conf. Wea. Analysis and Forecasting, San Antonio, Texas, Amer. Meteor. Soc.

 

Weber, D.B., F. W. Gallagher III, and K. W. Howard, 2001: Boundary Layer Targeted Observations Using the Glidersonde Meteorological Package in a Radio Controlled Aircraft Part I: Results.  Preprints AMS 11th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation.

 

Weber, D.B., F. W. Gallagher III, and K. W. Howard, 2001: Boundary Layer Targeted Observations Using the Glidersonde Meteorological Package in a Radio Controlled Aircraft Part II: Turbulence Signature and Platform Limitations.  Preprints AMS 11th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation.

           

            Weber, D.B. 1998: An investigation of the diurnal variability of the Central

Colorado Downslope Windstorm.  8th AMS conference on Mountain Wave Meteorology.

Flagstaff, AZ.

 

Doyle, J.D., D. R. Durran, B.A. Colle, C. Chen, M. Georgelin, V. Grubisic, W.R. Hsu, C.Y.

Huang, D. Landau, Y.L. Lin, G.S. Poulos, W.Y. Sun, D.B. Weber, M.G. Wurtele, and M.

Xue, 1998:  An intercomparison of model predicted wave breaking for the 11 January

Boulder Windstorm.  8th Conference on Mountain Wave Meteorology. Flagstaff, AZ.

 

           

Prepared Talks

 

11th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation, Albuquerque, NM. “Boundary Layer Targeted Observations Using the Glidersonde Meteorological Package in a Radio Controlled Aircraft Part I: Results”, January 2001.

 

11th Symposium on Meteorological Observations and Instrumentation, Albuquerque, NM. “Boundary Layer Targeted Observations Using the Glidersonde Meteorological Package in a Radio Controlled Aircraft Part II: Turbulence Signature and Platform Limitations”, January 2001.

 

1st Annual Linux Supercluster Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, “High resolution

Weather Forecasting on Linux Superclusters”, September, 2000.

 

8th conference on Mountain Wave Meteorology, Flagstaff, Arizona.  “An investigation of

the diurnal variability of the Central Colorado Downslope Windstorm”, August 1998.        

 

            Illinois Manufactures’ Association Environmental Compliance Conference, Chicago,

Illinois.  “Air Dispersion Modeling”, September 1990.

 

            National Weather Service Western Regional Headquarters.  “A simple numerical model

for improving precipitation forecasts over Northern Utah”, March, 1987.

 

University Space Research Association, Marshall Space Flight Center,

Huntsville, AL.  “A study of the Jet Stream Cirrus Clouds”, 1987. 

 

 

Other Presentations

 

            Poster:  OSCER Supercomputer Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma.

                         “The Current ARPS Forecast System”, September, 2002.

 

            Poster:  Stratified Rotating Turbulence Workshop, Boulder, Colorado.

                         “Recent Studies of Strong Mountain Waves and Downslope

                         Windstorms”, August 1996.

 

            Poster:  External Advisory Panel Review of CAPS, University of Oklahoma,

                         Norman, Oklahoma.  “The Effects of Variable Surface Neutral Layer  

                         Depths on a Simulated Downslope Windstorm”, August 1994.

 

            Poster:  External Advisory Panel Review of CAPS, University of Oklahoma,

                         Norman, Oklahoma.  “The ARPS Terrain Pre-Processor”, August 1993.

 

Awards

 

          Kennecott Copper Scholarship, 1980-1981.

 

 

Review of Journal Manuscripts

 

            I have reviewed several papers from the following professional journals:

 

                        Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

                        Monthly Weather Review

 

 

Professional Societies

 

            Member, American Meteorological Society.

            Member, Academy of Model Aeronautics.

 

References

 

            Available upon request